Food & Drink

Food & Drink
Grinding at Glazers.
Image: Martha Cheng

Home Brew

Exploring the city’s best coffee shops

Food & Drink / We locavores have it good in Hawaii. Not only do we benefit from a year-round growing season, but our unique climate and geography are ideal for crops that simply will not grow elsewhere in the United States. Case in point: coffee, which grows only in equatorial zones such as ours. On the mainland, even the most devoted of locavores find themselves making a quiet exception for their morning brew, which might be roasted locally but is grown, harvested and processed far, far away. But here in Hawaii, it’s easy to get coffee that’s local–from farm to brew.

It’s no secret that big coffee chains are becoming obnoxious. Starbucks recently announced the latest addition to its cup sizing: the 31-ounce Trenta, which is just an ounce shy of a Big Gulp. Do we really need that much coffee? Do we even need Starbucks at all?

It’s all the more reason to drink up the local brew. Here are a few of our favorite local coffee places.

Bad Ass Coffee

Choose from 100 percent Kona coffee or a Hawaiian blend for your drip–the latter ($2.75 for a small) is mellow and smooth, with light acidity and a nutty flavor. The Bad Ass folks also run an online store, making it easy to send coffee gifts to far-flung friends.

1104 Fort St. Mall, Mon.–Fri.: 7am–6pm, Sat.: 7am–4pm, Sun.: 7am–3pm, 524-0888, [badasscoffee.com]

Coffeeline

It’s not so much the coffee (though it’s very good) that hooks you. It’s the sort of atmosphere you don’t forget. The outside sitting area is airy, bright and lush with foliage and filled with mismatched seats and tables that Dennis, the owner (also known as Manoa’s Soup Nazi), says he found in the trash. Even more crammed is the kitchen, filled with pans, mugs, plates and bric-a-brac everywhere. Where does he even prepare the food? Who knows, but it’s good. Don’t even think about getting your coffee to go if you don’t have a reusable cup. And FYI: Coffeeline caters to University of Hawaii faculty.

1820 University Ave., Mon.–Fri.: 7am–2pm, Sat.–Sun.: 8am–Noon, 778-7909

Downtown Coffee

After trying Downtown Coffee’s brew, it was hard to muster the motivation to go anywhere else. It is, to be blunt, the perfect cup of coffee. Choose from the local drip coffee of the day (a Waialua blend when we visited, $1.68 for a small), or try the espresso made from 100 percent Kona peaberry. Its full body, notes of dark chocolate and hazelnut, and total lack of bitterness could lure anyone away from the ‘Bucks.

900 Fort St. Mall, Mon.–Fri.: 6am–4:30pm, Sat.: 7:30am–Noon, 599-5353

Glazers Coffee

This is a serious coffee shop, for multiple reasons. The organic, shade-grown coffee is expertly roasted and brewed for a smooth, nutty, and well-balanced cuppa. But the mood here is pretty serious as well; bring your laptop or a book, switch your phone to vibrate and take advantage of the study-hall vibe.

2700 S. King St., Mon.–Thu.: 6:30am–11pm, Fri.: 6:30am–9pm, Sat.–Sun.: 9am–11pm, 391-6548

Honolulu Coffee Company

For the ultimate coffee experience, try a French press of 100 percent Kona coffee at Honolulu Coffee ($6.95, serves two)–the technique produces a full-bodied and rich cup that complements the smooth, earthy qualities of Kona beans. The Hawaiian blend drip is also commendably well-balanced with slightly citrusy notes. Don’t miss the pastries (made by on-staff pastry chefs), especially the melt-in-your-mouth haupia macaroons.

1450 Ala Moana Blvd., Suite 3066, 8:30am–9pm daily, 533-1500 ext. 4, (more locations and hours listed at [honolulucoffee.com])

Kimobean

This roaster/brewer is all about the Hawaiian bean, with premium beans from Kona, Maui, Molokai and Kauai, all roasted weekly here on Oahu. Its 100 percent Kona drip coffee ($2.75 for a 12 oz. cup) is fruitier than most, with notes of cherry and a smooth chocolaty base. Sleek surroundings sweeten the deal.

2113 Kalakaua Ave., 7am–5pm daily, 923-4236 (more locations and hours listed at [kimobean.com])

Kona Mountain Coffee

Although this isn’t so much of a coffee shop as it is a retail store that happens to sell coffee, Kona Mountain Coffee is notable in that it grows, harvests and roasts the beans itself on 90 acres in Kona. Its 100 percent Kona coffee ($2.75 for a 12 oz. cup) is available in both medium and dark roasts, so you can pick your poison according to your taste.

1811 Ala Moana Blvd., 9am–8pm daily, 944-3633 (more locations and hours listed at [konamountaincoffee.com])

Manifest

Another great spot in one of Chinatown’s historic buildings is Manifest on Hotel Street. It offers a comfortable vibe and Oahu-grown Waialua Coffee in many manifestations–espresso, cappuccino and brewed. A place to sit, sip, see and be seen.

32 N. Hotel St., Mon.–Sat.: 8am–2am, closed on Sundays, 523-7575, [manifesthawaii.com]